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Patients


Five steps to patient participation

Step 1:
Know your brand and harness its potential value across the networked care model

Step 2:
Find out how well you are interacting with patients now

Step 3:
Co-design the new service with existing patients

Step 4:
Make sure patient experience is right

Step 5:
Harness as much patient participation as you can

Patient days drawing

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Step 1:

Know your brand and harness its potential value across the networked care model

  • Find out how well your brand is trusted and if there’s a gap between that and perception of your partner organisation.
  • Trust in your brand can generate patient confidence and staff pride, improving outcomes.
  • You may want to clearly articulate your brand to differentiate your service.

Step 2:

Find out how well you are interacting with patients now

  • Use our ‘Test your knowledge – five steps to patient participation tool’ and seek out examples across your organisation – you may be surprised how much is happening.
  • Identify one or more existing patient champions and involve them from the outset.
  • Establishing a baseline will help you evaluate any changes you make.

Step 3:

Co-design the new service with existing patients

  • Identify any patients in your existing service who live in the catchment of your potential host trust.
  • Talk to them individually or in groups; seek their stories and jointly generate ideas for the new service.
  • If there aren’t many, you could collaborate with patient groups or the local Healthwatch.

Step 4:

Make sure patient experience is right

  • All levels in the ‘hierarchy’ of patient interaction matter.
  • Engagement and involvement are more participative than experience in the tool but regular surveys of experience and other feedback opportunities should still be provided at all sites.

Step 5:

Harness as much patient participation as you can

  • Once a new unit starts, share any central site initiatives but also mine it for ideas.
  • Consider creating structures to encourage ideas such as an innovation fund or a prize.
  • Do things ‘with’ patients, not ‘for’ them.

patient participation characters drawing

Examples of the Moorfields’ experience:

“There’s far more patient interaction going on than we thought. It’s patchy, but where it’s being done well, it unlocks a range of positive initiatives which benefit everyone.”

“There are aspects of host hospitals that patients with sight loss are much more sensitive to, such as lighting, which they can swiftly identify.”

“We have glaucoma seminars for patients at one hospital and volunteer hand holders for surgical patients at another. If we celebrate these across the network we may encourage more good ideas.”